Denver Broncos: The Best Injuries

The Denver Broncos are going to suffer some injuries this year. It happens every year, to every team, and there’s really nothing that can be done about it. Trainers work as hard as they can, but they can’t eliminate them all.

Injuries are terrible in sports, and there have been a rash of them this year. Most recently, RGIII went down with a concussion that is now somewhat in doubt. He’s not the only one to get hurt, and some players—like the Panthers’ Kelvin Benjamin—have already been lost of the entire year.

Still, some injuries are worse than others. If Peyton Manning goes down, it’s going to have a huge impact on the team. If they lose a backup safety, the team will see virtually no change. So, what are the best positions to see injuries this year, if they have to happen at all?

Cornerback

The Broncos are fairly strong at corner. Bradley Roby would start on some teams, and he’s the third corner for the Broncos, behind Aqib Talib and Chris Harris. While losing any of them hurts the team, they do have the depth to overcome the loss. If Talib goes down, for example, the pairing of Harris and Roby wouldn’t be horrible. It’d still be better than what a lot of teams are putting out there on a weekly basis.

Again, the team would definitely get worse. Talib is better than Roby and having the depth is crucial for three-CB sets. But a blow like that wouldn’t sink their chances.

Wideout

As devastating as it would feel to lose Demaryius Thomas or Emmanuel Sanders, this is another position where the Broncos could probably keep playing at a high level. Cody Latimer has the raw talent to be very good. Not as good as the two above him, but he could be a real threat if pressed into service. Plus, he might develop faster if he was on the field, really helping him turn into the player the Broncos want him to be.

Plus, the Denver Broncos are a running team now, even with Peyton Manning. The focus on the air assault isn’t going to be as strong as it has been in the past. They’re not going to run as many sets with three or four wideouts, instead just using two and relying more on tight ends. With someone like Sanders missing, the team would get worse, but they could still run the offense effectively—especially with how Manning has always made unknown wideouts better.